Bruce Stokes

Indians Don't Hate Foreigners and Their Money Anymore

But can Prime Minister Modi capitalize on the changing winds and let foreign firms help build his “Make in India” economy?

To quote the Beatles, the ice is slowly melting between India and the United States after trade relations had been in a deep freeze for several years.

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Lame Duck? Shots Fired.

Why a Republican win on Tuesday may push the White House into a more aggressive foreign policy posture.

Americans head to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 4, with major international issues -- the U.S. effort to counter Islamic State (IS) extremism, how to deal with Iran, the Israeli-Palestinian situation, Russia, and President Barack Obama's general handling of foreign policy -- likely to play a role in their vote.

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Is Laziness the Cause of Economic Inequality?

Americans and the British lean toward moral weakness, but the rest of the world blames government policies.

Once, laments over economic inequality were the sole purview of the left.  But now the growing gap between the rich and the poor is a mainstream concern. "The distribution of income and wealth in the United States has been widening more or less steadily for several decades, to a greater extent than in most advanced countries," Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen observed in a speech on October 17. And "I think it is appropriate to ask whether this trend is compatible with values rooted in our nation's history." 

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Keep Your Eye on Beijing

While the world focuses on the Middle East and Ukraine, China's neighbors worry about the fallout of brewing tensions along its borders. And so should we.

While the world focuses on the tragic downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 over Ukraine and the deepening Israeli-Palestinian conflict, tensions in another of the world's hot spots -- the periphery of China -- continue to simmer. There is widespread concern among many of China's neighbors -- including Japan, Vietnam, and India -- that Beijing's territorial ambitions could lead to military conflict. And that concern appears to be growing. Even the Chinese are now worried about whether such frictions could lead to war. The United States and Europe may be distracted by pressing events in Eastern Europe and the Middle East, but Asians don't have that luxury. Tensions closer to home preoccupy them, according to a new Pew Research Center survey of nearly 15,000 people in 11 Asian nations.

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No Difference a Year Makes

One year on from the NSA surveillance revelations, guess what: the world shrugged. People still, more or less, like America.

A country's brand is a valued commodity, especially when that nation is the world's largest economic and strategic power. And, despite the declinists, America's image remains strong in much of the world, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Despite anger with Washington over U.S. spying on foreign leaders and foreign nationals, widespread opposition to U.S. drone strikes, disagreements about what to do in the Middle East, and other recurring tensions, majorities in 30 of 43 countries express a favorable opinion of the United States. And, 0verall, attitudes toward the United States are largely unchanged from 2013. This suggests that despite a perception at home that U.S. influence abroad is waning, there is little evidence of that erosion overseas.

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